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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
've heard paul ryan talk about about barack obama talk it. gwen: they don't have the same solutions. >> they don't have the same solutions and i'm not sure either one of them has a workable solution. gwen: we have another part of the discussion we want to continue because we don't want you tonight without turning to the passing of one of the most significant leaders of our time. world mandela shaped the he lived in and deeply influenced an american president who says his first political act to protest apartheid. he was released from given gives me a sense of what when guided can do by hopes and not their fears. like so many, i cannot imagine the example that nelson mandela set and songs i live i will do what i can to from him. >> there's mr. mandela, mr. nelson mandela, a free man first steps into a new south africa. gwen: nelson mandela captured the world's public imagination when he stepped from behind bars in 1990 after 27 years of captivity. a freedom fighter, a political leader, and a symbol of shocking, just change. he was 71 years old by the time he stepped out of jail that d
away from strife. and to turn away from racial divisions. >> woodruff: back in the u.s., paul solman digs into today's jobs report, which points to strong gains in hiring and a five-year low in the unemployment rate. and mark shields and david brooks are here. they reflect on mandela's life and the rest of the week's news. those are just some of the stories we're covering on tonight's "pbs newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the death of nelson mandela resonated across south africa and around the world today. millions mourned the former president and symbol of racial reconciliation and official
in places like berkshire county the hope is that here comes the sun once more. >>> paul solomon talks with small business owners about berk shares. >>> on the news hour tomorrow on air and online sits down with carlos santana. that is it for this edition of "pbs news hour weekend". i'm allison stewart. thanks for watching. >>> "pbs news hour weekend" is made possible by -- corporate funding is provided by mutual of america, designing customized, individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. additional support is provided by -- and by the corporation for public broadcasting and from contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you.
committee whether it's -- >> i went to washington -- >> rose: -- rand paul, paul ryan. >> i went to washington in 1994 and argued to raise the retirement age in 2007 because that's when i knew the demographics -- 2011. i had very little success. i haven't even gone to washington this time because it's my view until the young people show them that they're concerned on this issue the people in washington will not give a damn about this. >> rose: do you think that we -- i mean, government is dysfunctional, obviously, in terms of being able to do some things to address problems as it ought to be. do you think we can overcome that? is this in a sense where people say they can be dysfunctional in washington but we're going create something whether it's this kind of issue for you or other people in which we're going to affect elections and we're going to affect the public mind. >> rose: i know we will overcome it, but i don't know what the timeline on that is. we have these phases in america where crazy things happen economically and politically. and what's going on in washington now wi
at los angeles international airport has made his first court appearance. paul ciancia entered no plea today to charges he killed an airport security officer and wounded three other people last month. he was denied bail. the 23-year-old suspect was wounded by police during the attack. in economic news, a survey of leading corporate chief executives found they're more optimistic and plan to increase hiring. at the same time, growth at service sector companies last month was the weakest since june. the conflicting data left wall street looking for direction. the dow jones industrial average lost almost 25 points to close at 15,889. the nasdaq rose a fraction of a point to close at 4,038. there's word today that the great majority of american silent films are now gone forever. the library of congress reported 70% of the 11,000 feature-length movies have been lost or destroyed. only 14% still exist in their original format. that's due in part to the nitrate film stock, which was especially vulnerable to decay and fire. >> woodruff: still to come on the "newshour": negotiating with iran; th
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)